Il duca e la sua sposa (Italian Edition)

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  4. The Divine Comedy

That someone else is herself. Hers is the secret of the terrorist, dying to let her enemy know the depths of her envious hatred. The 'death of yet another' with which the passage ends refers to Turnus in such a way as to indicate that Lavinia understood that her mother had incorrectly assumed that Turnus was already dead, just as she does in Virgil's poem. The simile is not difficult or surprising.


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Just as a dreaming sleeper, awakened by a sunbeam, loses his hold on his dream in bits and pieces before it utterly disappears, so was Dante jarred from his visionary sleep by the sudden brightness of the Angel of Mercy. There may be a reference here to verses in the Aeneid II. Virgil's description of the beginning of sleep is, according to Venturi, reflected in Dante's description of its ending, both passages featuring forms of verbs for serpentine movements serpit , guizza. On the other hand, most commentators suggest that Dante's guizzare shudder, quiver, wriggle is more likely to be used to indicate the dying movement made by a fish out of water.

While Venturi's proposal is still seconded by a commentator or two, most currently do not refer to it. This angelic light outshines even that of the sun, explains Benvenuto comm. This simile should be remembered in the reading of the final simile of awakening in the poem Par. Dante's fascination with the state between dream and waking is a notable part of his program of investigating the mental state of humans see the note to Inf.

As Singleton notes, in this verse we have again an insistence on paying attention to a single thing here the angel's permissive command , to the exclusion of all others. Perhaps a paraphrase of Virgil's remarks will be helpful: 'This divine spirit does what we wish without our asking, hiding itself in its own radiance and thus allowing us to see ; and it deals with us as we deal with ourselves, for he who sees a need, and yet waits to be asked, unkindly predisposes himself toward denying the request. For the 'rule' apparently more consented to than insisted on that governs nocturnal stasis on the mountain see Sordello's explanation Purg.

The Angel of Mercy draws upon the Beatitude found in Matthew , 'Blessed are the peacemakers,' yet does so in such a way as to indicate tacitly the distinction between 'good' anger righteous indignation and the 'bad' form of wrath ira mala that is fueled by desire for personal revenge.

The sun having set, its rays touch only the higher reaches of the mountain.

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It is after 6pm and the first stars are visible. The protagonist's inner apostrophe of his flagging power of locomotion shows his awareness of the special kind of nocturnal debility afflicting souls on this mountain. As we will see, his physical condition matches that of a man who is slothful. Since, on the terrace of Wrath, Dante's learning experiences occurred in darkness, and since it is dark as he enters the fourth terrace, he assumes that he may be instructed in virtue by what he will hear. Just as the poem is now entering its second half and this cantica arriving at its midpoint, so the experience of the repentance of the seven capital vices has come to its central moment with Sloth.

From Dante's question and Virgil's answer we also understand that there is a gulf separating the vices below, all of which begin in the love of what is wrongful, from the rest, all of which result from insufficient or improper desire to attain the good.


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The sin purged here is called acedia in Latin and accidia in Italian. In the poem, the word will appear in the next canto, used retrospectively to indicate the sin repented here Purg. Scartazzini comm. This second extended 'diagram' is excused, as was the first Inferno XI , by the need to linger awhile before continuing the journey.

Compare verse 84 and Inferno XI. The rest of the canto is given over, without interruption, to Virgil's discourse on the nature of love. The given of Virgil's whole speech is the universality of love. It proceeds from God in all His creation, and from all things that He has created. In the rational beings angels and humans , it returns to Him; in the lower animals, to one another and to their habitat; in insentient bodies, to their habitat e.

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See Convivio III. Love is of two kinds, natural or 'mental. Thus all humans naturally desire the good. If that were the only love that motivated us, there would be no sin in the world. However, there is another kind of love, one reached by a mental effort, and thus found only in angels and humans.

Since angels have all made their will known, to love God eternally, only humans will be the subjects of Virgil's discourse. Human beings, using their free wills, may fall into three kinds of sin; choosing the wrong object for their loves sins repented on the first three terraces ; loving the good deficiently as do the slothful, whom we are about to encounter ; loving the good excessively the sins repented on the three highest terraces, Avarice, Gluttony, Lust. IV [Florence: Le Monnier, ] , pp.

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The lines essentially repeat what has been established in vv. The argument pauses for its first affirmation: whether we sin or use our free wills well, the results observed come from our ways of loving — and our merit or demerit accords with the nature of our loves. The first consequence of this doctrine is to remove two possible motivations from consideration: hatred of self or hatred of God, both of which are declared to be impossible. Singleton comm. The sins of suicide and blasphemy, however, surely seem to contradict this theoretical notion. Hatred of self or of God having been discarded as motivations for immoral human conduct, hatred of our neighbor remains, expressed in 1 prideful desire that his success be reversed so that we may be his superior, 2 in envious desire that his success be thwarted, 3 in wrathful desire to take revenge for the harm he has inflicted on us.

We realize — although we are told it in case we might not — that these are the sins of Pride, Envy, and Wrath that we have just finished visiting. The actual midpoint of the poem lies between these two verses, numbers and of the poem's 14, Giuseppe Verdi. Giovanni Pacini. Estella di Murcia. Federico Ricci. Tutti amanti. Carlo Romani. Giovanna di Fiandra. Carlo Boniforti. La Schiava Saracena.

The Divine Comedy

Saverio Mercadante. Crispino e la comare. Luigi Ricci and Federico Ricci.

Le nozze del Duca di Genova con la signorina Maria Luisa Alliaga dei Conti di Ricaldone.

Elisabetta di Valois. Antonio Buzzolla. Andrea Casalini. Federico Guglielmo De Liguoro. La prigioniera. Carlo Ercole Bosoni. Francesco Petrocini. Pittore e Duca. Since, on the terrace of Wrath, Dante's learning experiences occurred in darkness, and since it is dark as he enters the fourth terrace, he assumes that he may be instructed in virtue by what he will hear.

Just as the poem is now entering its second half and this cantica arriving at its midpoint, so the experience of the repentance of the seven capital vices has come to its central moment with Sloth. From Dante's question and Virgil's answer we also understand that there is a gulf separating the vices below, all of which begin in the love of what is wrongful, from the rest, all of which result from insufficient or improper desire to attain the good.

The sin purged here is called acedia in Latin and accidia in Italian. In the poem, the word will appear in the next canto, used retrospectively to indicate the sin repented here Purg. Scartazzini comm. This second extended 'diagram' is excused, as was the first Inferno XI , by the need to linger awhile before continuing the journey. Compare verse 84 and Inferno XI. The rest of the canto is given over, without interruption, to Virgil's discourse on the nature of love. The given of Virgil's whole speech is the universality of love. It proceeds from God in all His creation, and from all things that He has created.

In the rational beings angels and humans , it returns to Him; in the lower animals, to one another and to their habitat; in insentient bodies, to their habitat e. See Convivio III. Love is of two kinds, natural or 'mental. Thus all humans naturally desire the good. If that were the only love that motivated us, there would be no sin in the world.

However, there is another kind of love, one reached by a mental effort, and thus found only in angels and humans. Since angels have all made their will known, to love God eternally, only humans will be the subjects of Virgil's discourse. Human beings, using their free wills, may fall into three kinds of sin; choosing the wrong object for their loves sins repented on the first three terraces ; loving the good deficiently as do the slothful, whom we are about to encounter ; loving the good excessively the sins repented on the three highest terraces, Avarice, Gluttony, Lust.

IV [Florence: Le Monnier, ] , pp. The lines essentially repeat what has been established in vv.